A Few of Our Favorite Things

A Few of Our Favorite Things | November 2018

This month we’re not only thinking about gratitude but also about the dedicated men and women that have served our country – past and present. To start, we’d love to share this poem that was brought to our attention by Kay Bauer, longtime MBS yoga student and retired nurse who served a total of thirty-five years in the United States Navy. The author of the poem, Diane Carlson Evans, served as a nurse in the United States Army during the Vietnam War. Kay and Diane worked together to establish the Vietnam Women’s Memorial Project (now the Vietnam Women’s Memorial Foundation) in Washington D.C.

Our War – by Diane Carlson Evans

I don’t go off to war, so they say,
I’m a woman.

Who then has worn my boots?
And whose memories are these,
of youth’s suffering?

I’m a woman and I’ve tasted man’s war.
Our war.
And he knows that I love in no greater way
than to share in his life or his death.

What are the rules?
Man or woman,
we are prey to suffer and survive together.

Please don’t forget me.
I’ve been through war’s hell and if only you will listen,
I’ve a story of those chosen to sacrifice for us all.

 

Julie Riff, one of the voices behind our newsletter, told us to keep our eyes out for a film by Louise Woehrle called Stalag Luft III – One Man’s Story. This film tells the story of Louise’s uncle (and twin of her father), World War II U.S. Army Air Force,’The Mighty Eighth’ Bombardier Lt. Charles Woehrle who was shot down May 29,1943, captured by the Nazis and held prisoner in Stalag Luft III (depicted in the film ‘The Great Escape’). The documentary takes us back with vivid detail, filled with grit and grace as Charles relives his experiences. Louise is currently working on submitting the documentary to film festivals and hopes to show it at the Minneapolis-St. Paul Film Festival in 2019. Have a look at the trailer here and to find screenings, head to whirlygigproductions.com

 

Our final recommendation comes from Katie Kohlbeck who recently saw a special screening of Lives Well Lived as part of Reimagine End of Life, a week of events that explores questions around life and death. The touching documentary interviews 40 individuals between the ages of 75 to 103 who they share their insights and experiences of living a meaningful life. Many of those interviewed share their stories of living through war, economic hardship, and challenging circumstances – yet, they all are grateful for what they have and continue to live life to the fullest with curiosity, joy, and kindness. A wonderful film to remind you of what really matters in life. Visit the Lives Well Lived website to watch the trailer, learn more, and see if there’s a screening happening near you.