A Few of Our Favorite Things

A Few Of Our Favorite Things | January 2019

This month’s theme is all about altered perspectives. Our point of view is subject to change and this can occur in any number of ways: by reading a profound line in a book, hearing a yoga teacher’s instructions in a new way, watching a story told through a film or TV, or listening to an interview on a podcast.

If we’re open to the happening, our perspective is ready to shift in most any experience or conversation we might have. Here’s what the team is ruminating on this month, including some personal experiences.

Bethany Hutchinson recently read The Heart Speaks: A Cardiologist Reveals the Secret Language of Healing by Mimi Guarneri and says it’s the best book she’s read in a long time.

The Burden of Proof, an episode of the podcast Revisionist History changed Rob Ley’s relationship with football. The episode spoke about the tie between football and head injuries like CTE and Rob says, “It prompted me to give up a 50-year love affair with football. I haven’t watched a game since.”

A 2-part series on the PBS’ Frontline called The Facebook Dilemma caught Amy Samson-Burke’s attention saying the show described social media as a uniting and dividing force in a way that brought it home for her.

At times a shift in our perspective and understanding of humanity are prompted through conversations or a moment of realization.

Amy also mentioned a recent conversation she had over the holidays with her nieces and says, “[It] was both energizing and concerning as we discussed what it’s like to be a 20-something trying to figure out life – the pressures, the opportunities, the fishbowl of social media. It gave me the chance to be an observer, less involved in their lives than I am with my own kids, and gave them a chance to really open up to a trusted adult.  It made me realize what I have learned and appreciate the wisdom that living brings.  It provided the pause I needed to appreciate their experience and honor that period of life from a different perspective.” Food for thought as we ponder the experience of living for different generations…

Finally, Matthew Sanford describes this moment that baked his own noodle: “When I realized that you don’t breathe prana…prana breathes you. Or more tangibly, your lungs don’t breathe prana… they are manifestations of prana.”